Brexit leaves Lithuania’s neighbours uneasy over EU, Russia

Meanwhile, politicians in Latvia fear that the chaos will allow Russia to take on a more aggressive stance in the Baltic states.

“When the referendum results were announced, one of the most important topics was the fate of emigrants. The public became worried about their situation in Great Britain because they could easily be forced to return. Poles living in Great Britain experienced displays of hate after the referendum. This is alarming,” said Nijolė Druto, an LRT correspondent in Warsaw.

“Another very important question is the financial losses that Poland will experience, since the money emigrants send back to family members here helps fill Poland’s budget. The Polish minority in Great Britain includes about 1.5 million people, so economists are saying that the ability to provide them with jobs and social guarantees if they return could be a problem,” Druto added.

“What’s being discussed most is whether they will have to go to another country or go home. However, a small survey of Latvians working in Great Britain was performed and it became clear that more than two thirds of the emigrants would not return to Latvia if they had to leave Great Britain. Some are saying that many of them would go to Ireland,” said Arūnas Vaikutis, an LRT correspondent in Riga.

“It is believed that Latvia will really suffer,” Vaikutis added. “Latvia is too small and will not be able to defend its interests with the EU flowing with the current and larger states deciding its direction.”

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