Russian Ambassador Alexander Udaltsov
CORPORATE

Russian ambassador: Lithuania owes Russia 72 billion US dollars

After another May passed placing a flower crown placed near the monument commemorating those that had perished during Lithuania’s road to freedom, with the before mentioned action the Russian ambassador to Lithuania Alexander Udaltsov raised quite a few eyebrows: could the denier of Lithuania’s occupation, Moscow have changed its mind and is finally admitting the historic fact with all of its potential consequences? The newest interview with the Russian Ambassador to Lithuania dispelled such hopes. […]

Kražiai
History

English Aristocrats in Kražiai in the Middle of the 16th Century

Catherine Willaughby, the Duchess of Suffolk (1519/1520-1580) and her second husband Richard Bertie (1517-1582), who were closely tied to England’s royal family, lived in the town of Kražiai, not far from Kelmė, from the middle of 1557 to March 1559. As a faithful Protestant, she later became a hero, with ballands, plays and films made about her. […]

Žydų (Jews) street in Vilnius
History

The Jewish Quarter in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania – isolation or privilege?

Quarters comprising of several streets that were designed along religious, ethnic or professional lines were a regular way of life in European cities during the Middle Ages. Thus the settling of Jews, who employed the use of a section of the city that was delegated to them by law did not go counter to the pattern that had developed for settling in cities. Orthodox believers, Germans, Jews, butchers, glass makers and others who established themselves in Great Duchy of Lithuania (GDL) cities divided up living space in a similar manner. Thus Jews brought traditions to the GDL that were typical for them in the quarters they lived, traditions that coincided with other trends that managed to express themselves in GDL cities. […]

Night sky in Kernavė
History

Origins of the Kernavė’s thunder God Perkūnas

A bearded, long haired man with an austere face that is depicted by a 12 cm bronze sculpture is the most famous archeological find over the last 150 years, which made Kernavė famous. The man’s nakedness is covered with a cloth kerchief which is draped over his right hand and turned over hi s hips. We see an object of unclear origins in his elevated left hand that is decorated with wavy lines; in his right hand, the man is also holding something, however only a hole in the hand remains. There is a vertical hole one and a half centimeters in diameter in the sculpture. By the middle of the 19th century, they believed that they’d found in Kernavė, a sculpture of the pagan god of Thunder, Perkūnas. […]

History

Legend of Vilnius: facts and fiction

The founding myth of Vilnius has many affinities with legends of Rome and other great cities. Though hardly historically accurate, it was necessary to legitimize the royal seat of a medieval grand duke. […]

Romuvan Pagan Ceremony in Lithuania, ii Wikipedia
History

Charms and superstitions of pagan Lithuanians

Lithuania remained pagan until the late Middle Ages and, as such, was an object of curiosity as well as hostility for Christian Europe. Paganism, wrote thirteenth-century Franciscan scholar Bartholomew the Englishman, was “ritus mirabilis”. Christian scholars who described pagan rituals did not shy away from negative stereotyping, although sometimes their writings give neutral, almost ethnographic descriptions.

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